Art period – Modern Art For Kids http://www.modernartforkids.com/ Wed, 25 May 2022 15:09:07 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://www.modernartforkids.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/11/icon-6.png Art period – Modern Art For Kids http://www.modernartforkids.com/ 32 32 🌱Flags at half mast + SD = Safe City + ‘Period Poverty’ + Pup Season https://www.modernartforkids.com/%f0%9f%8c%b1flags-at-half-mast-sd-safe-city-period-poverty-pup-season/ Wed, 25 May 2022 15:09:07 +0000 https://www.modernartforkids.com/%f0%9f%8c%b1flags-at-half-mast-sd-safe-city-period-poverty-pup-season/ Hello everyone. It’s me, Bettyann Pernice, your Daily host. Here’s the local news you need to know right now. First, today’s weather forecast: Low clouds, then some sunshine. High: 71, Low: 64. 📢 I am looking for business owners and marketers in San Diego who want to get noticed, connect with customers and increase sales. […]]]>

Hello everyone. It’s me, Bettyann Pernice, your Daily host. Here’s the local news you need to know right now.


First, today’s weather forecast:

Low clouds, then some sunshine. High: 71, Low: 64.


📢 I am looking for business owners and marketers in San Diego who want to get noticed, connect with customers and increase sales.

I have a limited number of sponsorships available to introduce our San Diego Daily readers to local businesses they need to know. If this is you, then I urge you to learn more and secure your place now.


Before you start: It has come to my attention that the San Diego Daily was late in reporting the May 23 deadline for mail-in ballots. Please note that residents can still register to vote at their designated voting center from June 4-7 and vote at the same time. For more details: (County News Center)

Here are today’s top stories in San Diego:

Today’s newsletter is brought to you in part by Ring, a partner of the Patch brand. Whether you’re working from home or streaming your favorite movies, the new Ring Alarm Pro gives you an internet connection you can rely on, while keeping your home safe.

To learn more about the innovative security system, or to build your own custom system, you can visit Ring here.


Today in San Diego:

  • Story time in Mandarin Chinese — Mira Mesa Branch Library (10:30 a.m.)
  • Story time in the park – Kensington Library / Normal Heights (10:30 a.m.)
  • Knit and Crochet Circle — Rancho Peñasquitos Library (1:00 p.m.)
  • Paper pen writing group — Riford/La Jolla branch library (1 p.m.)
  • DO YOUR HOMEWORK AT THE LIBRARY — Linda Vista Branch Library (3 p.m.)
  • Kamishibai Story Time: Street Theater and Japanese Storytelling – University Heights branch library. (4 p.m.)

From my notebook:

  • San Diego Police Department: His name is Sai, and he is a trained Mobil Scent Detection Dog (MOD). Sai is trained to detect explosives. It works with Crisis Volunteers and RSVP groups and is used at major events. (Facebook)
  • San Diego Humane Society: The Emergency Response Team (ERT) has volunteered to rescue animals affected by the wildfires. An injured little kitten was rescued from the New Mexico wildfires and is now recovering. Many thanks to the ERT. (Facebook)
  • San Diego Central Library: Do you like African art? The Central Library Art Gallery will present “Echoes of Africa” during the month of June. It will feature artifacts from Mesa College’s collection of African art. Mark your calendar! (Facebook)
  • Feeding San Diego: Many residents are worried about food insecurity. This stress can have an impact on their mental health. Find out how Feeding San Diego can help you. (Facebook)
  • Downtown San Diego Partnership: The Grow Urban initiative can lessen the impact of urban streets and transform the downtown. Over 100 trees were planted for Arbor Day and Earth Day. The city center becomes greener and more beautiful. (Facebook)
  • SD Library Foundation: Need a safe and secure drop-off location for your mail-in ballot? Check with your local branch of the San Diego Public Library System for details. (Facebook)

More from our sponsors – please support the local news!

Events:

  • Calm, cool and invested – How to protect your money in today’s market. (May 27)
  • Breast ultrasound screening comes directly to you! (May 28)
  • Webin.ar Retirement Taxes (June 6)
  • Webinar on retirement taxes on June 7 and 8! (June 7)
  • Add your event

Lodging:


You are now in the loop and ready to start this Thursday. See you soon!

Bettyanne Pernice

Got a news tip or suggestion for an upcoming San Diego Daily? Contact me at sandiego@patch.com

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The Summer Arts Kickoff Party kicks off a busy time for Emporia Arts Center https://www.modernartforkids.com/the-summer-arts-kickoff-party-kicks-off-a-busy-time-for-emporia-arts-center/ Tue, 24 May 2022 03:26:13 +0000 https://www.modernartforkids.com/the-summer-arts-kickoff-party-kicks-off-a-busy-time-for-emporia-arts-center/ David Mai (center) shapes earthenware plates during a demonstration at the Emporia Arts Center’s Summer Arts Launch Party on Monday. Chuck Samples/KVOE News. The Emporia Arts Center held its first Summer Arts Kickoff Party in three years on Monday. Children and families were able to enjoy several art demonstrations and a ceramics demonstration by David […]]]>

David Mai (center) shapes earthenware plates during a demonstration at the Emporia Arts Center’s Summer Arts Launch Party on Monday. Chuck Samples/KVOE News.

The Emporia Arts Center held its first Summer Arts Kickoff Party in three years on Monday.

Children and families were able to enjoy several art demonstrations and a ceramics demonstration by David Mai, who brought terracotta to work on plates. He says he received a lot of questions from the children present.


Fanestil and Hostess also provided free food during the event, and residents could also enroll in summer art classes.

Arts Center Director Dawn Young was thrilled to see the turnout and interest in the summer artistic offerings.

While the Arts Center is gearing up for summer art classes, it’s also gearing up for the Missoula Children’s Theater July 18-22. It’s also kicking off its annual membership drive ahead of the performing arts series schedule, which could be announced next week. Young isn’t announcing the schedule yet, but she says there will be a Broadway musical at Emporia.

More information is online at www.emporiaksarts.org.

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TeWinkle Middle School will move to 7-day period, giving children more choices to choose from https://www.modernartforkids.com/tewinkle-middle-school-will-move-to-7-day-period-giving-children-more-choices-to-choose-from/ Sat, 21 May 2022 03:41:00 +0000 https://www.modernartforkids.com/tewinkle-middle-school-will-move-to-7-day-period-giving-children-more-choices-to-choose-from/ Educators would move mountains for the well-being of students, so why not lesson periods? That was the consensus earlier this week when administrators at TeWinkle Middle School informed parents that the bell schedule would change next year to accommodate a seven-period day. A change in schedules at the Costa Mesa campus and the shortening of […]]]>

Educators would move mountains for the well-being of students, so why not lesson periods? That was the consensus earlier this week when administrators at TeWinkle Middle School informed parents that the bell schedule would change next year to accommodate a seven-period day.

A change in schedules at the Costa Mesa campus and the shortening of classes, from 58 minutes to 47, will give children one more period to fill with an elective course, such as art, publications or engineering. New classes are also due to be added next year, including French, Spanish, Art 2, and Design and Modeling Engineering.

While the current regular bell schedule allows TeWinkle students to take six classes from 8:45 a.m. to 3:35 p.m., under the new seven-period schedule, classes will start at 8:05 a.m. and end at 2:40 p.m.

Parent Laura Van de Merghel presents ideas for new thoughtful small-group electives during a forum Feb. 15 at a TeWinkle Middle School forum.

(Sara Cardina)

“The addition of a seventh period is more consistent with other middle schools in our school district, allowing our TeWinkle students to take additional electives,” the Newport-Mesa Unified School District spokeswoman wrote Wednesday. , Annette Franco, in an e-mail to the families.

The changes follow a series of meetings and conversations between parents, teachers, administrators and district officials that followed complaints from parents TeWinkle students had far fewer elective choices than their counterparts at other campuses.

Figures showed the campus offered 13 elective courses, compared to 21 at Ensign Intermediate and Corona del Mar colleges and 27 at Costa Mesa Middle School.

Additionally, many TeWinkle students are enrolled in the Advancement Via Individual Determination (AVID) or AVID Excel tutoring program, a class that helps English learners accelerate their language acquisition. For them, participation was their only elective choice.

Parents, primarily those with elementary school-aged children whose schools feed into TeWinkle, reported these disparities to district officials, who convened a forum in February to discuss solutions.

Then someone suggested a day of seven periods. Principal Dipali Potnis discussed the idea with teachers and school staff, who overwhelmingly approved of the changes needed to give the children one more period.

“I can already hear students saying that they are delighted to be able to take another elective course. [And] the teachers are thrilled,” Potnis said Thursday. “I’m so proud that everyone came together and made this happen.”

Michelle Erickson, a Costa Mesa resident, whose son and daughter attend nearby Victoria Elementary School, has been in regular contact with the district and attended the Feb. 15 community forum. She said she was happy that students would have more choices next year.

“It’s a big step in the right direction. I also think it’s a testament to a public movement,” Erickson said Thursday. “The system can work if the public is engaged and when we have leaders who listen and care enough.”

Laura Van de Merghel, whose daughter is a seventh year student at TeWinkle and whose son attends third year at Victoria, said it was distressing to learn that TeWinkle students do not have the same access to lessons elective than children on other campuses. While the news this week is good, she said more needs to be done to bring schools in the Estancia High School area to the level that staff, students and families deserve.

“I really feel like we still have separate schools, but we’ll take what we can,” she added. “The next step is, since we’re going to build a theater in Estancia, get theater and music going, or try ceramics — give the kids more creative outlets.”

TeWinkle Middle School in Costa Mesa on Friday, May 20, 2022.

Administrators at TeWinkle Middle School in Costa Mesa informed parents Wednesday that the school calendar will change next school year to accommodate a seven-period day.

(Kevin Chang / personal photographer)

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Picasso: Painting the Blue Period at the Phillips Collection https://www.modernartforkids.com/picasso-painting-the-blue-period-at-the-phillips-collection/ Thu, 19 May 2022 13:40:53 +0000 https://www.modernartforkids.com/picasso-painting-the-blue-period-at-the-phillips-collection/ Picasso Exhibition: Painting the Blue Period © 2022 Estate of Pablo Picasso / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York Picasso Exhibition: Painting the Blue Period © 2022 Estate of Pablo Picasso / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York Before macabre clowns and circus performers, the revolutionary movement of cubism, the notoriously cruel treatment of women […]]]>

Picasso Exhibition: Painting the Blue Period © 2022 Estate of Pablo Picasso / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Picasso Exhibition: Painting the Blue Period © 2022 Estate of Pablo Picasso / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Before macabre clowns and circus performers, the revolutionary movement of cubism, the notoriously cruel treatment of women and the immense power of GuernicaPicasso began turning simple repurposed canvases into brilliant blues.

A blockbuster exhibition at the Phillips Collection attempts the difficult feat of excising and contextualizing a young Spanish artist from decades of explosive, iconic creativity and misogyny. Pablo Picasso’s early years take center stage in ‘Picasso: Painting the Blue Period’, a stunning look at his early productions which run through June 12.

For Picasso fans and skeptics alike, myself included, this exhibition is a demanding and deeply rewarding reassessment of the artist as a young man.

“Picasso was an artist who drew on such a range of sources from his contemporaries, from Old Masters, from non-Western sources, and he turned it into something that was uniquely his own perspective,” the Phillips curator said. , Susan Behrends Frank. The diplomat from Washington. “And that gift was there from the start.”

Pablo Picasso, The Blue Room, 1901, Oil on canvas, 19 7/8 x 24 1/4 in., The Phillips Collection, Acquired 1927 © 2022 Estate of Pablo Picasso / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

This hit show revels in both science and art. Looking at how Picasso explored stylistic changes early in his career, the Phillips Collection opens up and explodes the canvases on display. Three paintings from the Blue Period are at the center of the exhibition: that of the Phillips The blue room from 1901, and Crouching Beggars (1902) and Soup (1903) from the exhibition’s partner, the Art Gallery of Ontario. Curators have literally peeled back the layers of these works, performing extensive technical research into the works hidden beneath each painting.

The Blue Period, between 1901 and 1904, features some of Picasso’s most fascinating and politically charged works. It focused on marginalized people, especially women, and the harsh reality of poverty in Europe. He reflected on life, death, the sacred, the profane.

Behrends Frank noted that the genesis of this exhibit stemmed from scientific research begun on The blue room– which has been in the Phillips collection since 1927 – in 2007. In 2012, “this project became more broadly investigative, and our associate art conservator Patti Favero brought together this team of scientists from different institutions who facilitated this investigation” , she said. .

The conservation department of the Phillips Collection had acquired a digital infrared camera, which enabled Favero to obtain a much clearer image of the portrait hidden beneath The blue room, recalls Behrends Frank. After the intervention of the Art Gallery of Ontario, the curators realized that they had the ingredients for an important exhibition on the transitional moments of Picasso’s blue period.

Then two things upset the plan. First, the Picasso Museum in Paris launched a huge retrospective on the artist’s Blue and Rose periods in 2018. “It kind of pushed us further down the road, gave us more time to research our own project,” noted Behrends Frank. .

“And then COVID kicked in.”

We all should have been able to visit ‘Picasso: Painting the Blue Period’ in 2020. But the curator noted that the pandemic disruption gave the exhibit “a window of opportunity that actually worked in our favor.”

Securing loans for Picasso in this early period of his career was incredibly difficult. “For North American and certainly American museums, there is a cultural embargo between Russia and the United States, which also extends to Canada. And so we are not in a position here, on this side of the Atlantic, to borrow works from the two Russian museums rich in Blue Period works,” said Behrends Frank. The diplomat from Washington.

So they looked elsewhere. The paintings come from Israel, Japan, Spain, Canada and Baltimore. And his co-curator at the Art Gallery of Ontario was able to arrange five loans from Japan in the exhibition. “It’s an incredible achievement for us and these are major works that reveal different aspects of this period, of early Picasso,” she said.

Throughout the show, visitors are confronted with works that are indeed amazing achievements. We are immediately welcomed by the piercing and direct gaze of the artist, in a self-portrait, Yo, from 1901. He is 19 years old. Don’t miss the ‘Yo’ inscribed in the upper left corner. It’s like a black lightning bolt.

“I keep remembering that in that first gallery that we have, you know, he was 19. That’s just the kind of maturity he had, it still fascinates me, it amazes me, the how he was able to absorb so many diverse sources,” Behrends Frank said.

The show is particularly in-depth in its exploration of the artists who influenced Picasso. Degas, Toulouse-Lautrec, Isidre Nonell, Rodin, El Greco and many others are rewarded for their impact on the young artist.

“We wanted all our visitors to be able to see how Picasso was inspired by artists he liked and how he manipulated, modified, reinvented his sources in his own voice. We just thought that was a very important way to think about works from the blue period in a larger context,” said Behrends Frank.

Alongside the in-depth look at the artists who inspired Picasso, the exhibition offers a fascinating dive into the science behind the art. Conservatives examined The blue room with X-rays, microanalysis of paint samples and spectral data. They used state-of-the-art imaging and analysis technology to find the hidden portrait of an unknown man under the canvas. It’s amazing (and you can watch the videos online).

The emphasis on science takes nothing away from the art on the walls of the Phillips Collection. He builds the image of an extraordinary and inventive young artist, not yet composed in the role he will later establish himself. The exhibition raises dozens of questions even as it answers the mystery of what lies beneath some of his canvases: what does Picasso really reveal and hide? Who is the voyeur here?

Picasso Exhibition: Painting the Blue Period © 2022 Estate of Pablo Picasso / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Even in the emotional turmoil of the blue period, the works sparkle with creative tension. In the remarkable The dead woman, blue paint spills over the edge of the exposed canvas. It’s haunting. His paintings of blue rooftops cackle with the sparkle of turn-of-the-century city life. His 1901 Evocation (The Burial of Casagemas) is a powerful painting reflecting the death by suicide of his friend, painter and poet Carles Casagemas. The exhibit notes that 60 years after producing this remarkable image, Picasso told another friend that his Blue Period was a response to Casagemas’ death.

Paintings from the Blue Period from his time in Paris are presented as part of an in-depth analysis of Picasso’s visit to the women’s prison at the Saint-Lazare Hospital near Montmartre. These paintings offer several moments of reflection on the contrast between the sensitivity he shows to these women and the mistreatment he inflicted on so many women throughout his personal life.

There are many fascinating details, buried secrets and contextual clues to explore in the exhibit. The extraordinary revelation of the hidden parts of Picasso’s canvases fascinates, disconcerts and gives a new look at the sometimes all too familiar artist.

“For us, the curatorial part of the project revealed a lot of information about his creative process – how he would make decisions about the final composition that we see on the canvas, how he might one day , just his style could change so drastically during this year of 1901,” Behrends Frank said. different sources, process it through him.”

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Judge for Yourself: Man Uses Art to Escape ‘Franic’ Time https://www.modernartforkids.com/judge-for-yourself-man-uses-art-to-escape-franic-time/ Sun, 15 May 2022 21:30:00 +0000 https://www.modernartforkids.com/judge-for-yourself-man-uses-art-to-escape-franic-time/ “I like to be spontaneous. I’m not one of those artists who agonize over something for weeks. I just like to do it and move on,” says Group of Seven-inspired artist From hammer to paintbrush, David Murphy of Barrie has lived a unique life. After a life spent mostly in a courtroom — first as […]]]>

“I like to be spontaneous. I’m not one of those artists who agonize over something for weeks. I just like to do it and move on,” says Group of Seven-inspired artist

From hammer to paintbrush, David Murphy of Barrie has lived a unique life.

After a life spent mostly in a courtroom first as a barrister in a major Toronto law firm, then as a judge of the Cayman Islands High Court the 73-year-old is enjoying a simpler life these days, spending mostly in his basement art studio.

Born and raised in the city, Murphy says he’s been painting for almost 50 years, but it wasn’t until he started taking art classes once a week. while working at a large litigation firm in downtown Toronto in the 1980s that he really started to like her.

“It seems strange. It’s a time in your life when you’re probably the busiest, craziest and most frenetic of your career,” he said. BarrieToday. “I decided I wanted a diversion from law school and started copying Group of Seven oil paintings just for fun.”

In 1989 Murphy moved to Hong Kong, where he spent the next seven years working as a professor of law at the University of Hong Kong. And although he didn’t paint much during this time, he says he would find time between classes to take occasional lessons.

During this time, he experimented with watercolor and took courses in Chinese brush painting and art restoration. He has also developed a research specialty in art law, published numerous scientific articles on the subject and given conferences all over the world. He is also the author of a book on the legal aspects of the Chinese art trade, published by Oxford University Press.

Murphy then moved to the Cayman Islands and spent the next four years as a High Court judge, a career he admits left very little time for art.

In 2000, at the age of 51, Murphy retired and moved to Europe, where he picked up his brushes and began to paint regularly.

“I started doing a lot of shows and exhibitions in Malta,” he says, adding that he always knew he would come back to Canada.

Murphy, who returned to Barrie in 2013, says he has always been drawn to the Impressionists and credits the famous Group of Seven with inspiring his own work.

“When people think of Impressionism they usually think of European Impressionist painters without really realizing that we had our own school of Impressionist painters here in Canada with the Group of Seven who were fabulous,” he says. “I think it was meeting AY Jackson that really inspired me (and) that’s probably when I started to really like going to art galleries.

“At the time, the McMichael Gallery in Kleinburg was filled with Group of Seven paintings. … It was just a visual feast at the time and that obviously influenced me,” Murphy adds.

Although most of his work over the years has featured landscapes and cityscapes almost entirely in oil, he says he’s been thinking outside the box in recent years and starting to move into the abstract. using acrylic for a “change of pace”.

“Figurative landscapes and cityscapes… that’s what I’ve been doing for decades, but not in a realistic style. I don’t like realistic art. I just prefer to take a picture, so it’s impressionistic,” he says.

An avid traveler, the COVID-19 pandemic has put a damper on that for Murphy. He says he found himself in his basement studio filling the weather during the winters.

“I decided to try something different. I started producing a lot of summaries…most of them experimental and I think some of them are pretty good,” he says. “It’s really just a matter of combining color and shapes in a pleasing combination.

“I like to be spontaneous. I’m not one of those artists who agonize over something for weeks. I just like to do it and move on.”

Murphy’s work is on display in a new solo exhibition throughout May at the Falls Gallery at the Alton Mill Art Centre, located at 1402 Queen Street W., Caledon.

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Downton Abbey: A New Era is the period response to Ted Lasso | Movie reviews and news | St. Louis | St. Louis News and Events https://www.modernartforkids.com/downton-abbey-a-new-era-is-the-period-response-to-ted-lasso-movie-reviews-and-news-st-louis-st-louis-news-and-events/ Fri, 13 May 2022 20:27:00 +0000 https://www.modernartforkids.com/downton-abbey-a-new-era-is-the-period-response-to-ted-lasso-movie-reviews-and-news-st-louis-st-louis-news-and-events/ Click to enlarge Focus characteristics Julian Fellowes’ Aristocrats and Scullery Class Return to the Big Screen in Downton Abbey: A New Era. One wonders if Americans will ever tire of the up-and-down intrigues of the people of Downton Abbey. So long as it prevents us from recognizing our built-in American class system, maybe not. It’s […]]]>
Click to enlarge

Focus characteristics

Julian Fellowes’ Aristocrats and Scullery Class Return to the Big Screen in Downton Abbey: A New Era.

One wonders if Americans will ever tire of the up-and-down intrigues of the people of Downton Abbey.

So long as it prevents us from recognizing our built-in American class system, maybe not. It’s just too delicious to imagine that old-world Brits have a monopoly on social class and that we unfettered Yanks have escaped all that nonsense.

The aristocrats and scullery class of Julian Fellowes return to the big screen with plenty of new adventures, romances, strife and class snobbery – most of it coming from the crowd below. Downtown Abbey: A New Era boasts the kind of overloaded plot reminiscent of lesser Victorian-era novels, where countless plot lines are introduced only to be stitched together beautifully at the end. Fast-paced, occasionally silly and action-packed, this is the Downtown for short attention spans.

A five-year-old Public Broadcasting Service television series, Downton Abbey had spawned a previous film, a satisfying 2019 version directed by Michael Engler, which revived the Crawleys in the Roaring Twenties. Now comes the follow-up, A New Era, set circa 1929 and directed by Simon Curtis with composer John Lunn’s plum-themed music like fondant on a delicious cake, taking us back to the world worthy of dressing up for dinner and an ironclad servant pecking Command.

Happiness and normality seem to reign like A new era opens with the wedding of Tom Branson (Allen Leech) and Lucy Smith (Tuppence Middleton). This allows for a reminder of all the key players in the saga, captured in black and white photographs at the wedding.

But peace does not reign for long. Two fat kerfuffles define this Downtown.

While the first film tore Crawley Manor apart with the arrival of the King and Queen of England and their haughty help, here the intruders are of a different order. The British Lion Film Company, tired of using backlots, wants to shoot its latest silent production The Gambler in Downtown. While the idea of ​​red-faced, threadbare actors wandering the halls is off-putting to the endlessly sniffing Earl of Grantham Robert Crawley (Hugh Bonneville), there’s that leaky roof to fix and other unsexy business to sort out. , notes her daughter, the infinitely practical Lady Mary Crawley (Michelle Dockery).

Then a subplot emerges. A previously unknown Marquess has bequeathed a villa in France to the Dowager Countess of Grantham Violet Crawley (Maggie Smith), possibly in recognition of their cut short romance.

In the type of mildly comedic culture shock that makes stories such as Emily in Paris sing, the stuffy Brits take on the far more laissez-faire French as Robert and Cora (Elizabeth McGovern) travel with relatives and servants to the villa in question. Carson (Jim Carter) is particularly irritated by the French manner and takes it upon himself to illustrate their failings in good taste. It’s the same tension exploited in Fellowes’ American class drama, The Golden age between the Russell estate’s new butler and the former Van Rhijn butler, who better understands the intricacies of a well-laid British-style table.

Sex is at the heart of every plot. The movie stars – including Myrna Dalgleish (Laura Haddock), Cockney’s beautiful and cruel first lady – and the director introduce a thrill of fantasy and sexual desire to the ranks. Lady Mary becomes intrigued by handsome director Jack Barber (Hugh Dancy) and other family members take an interest in the Ice Queen star and her debonair, pencil-moustached man Guy Dexter (flat Dominic West). Although they profess a distaste for the sordid art of “kinema”, as Robert Crawley pronounces it, they are nevertheless delighted and curious about the whole process, the frenetic cinema, the magic of cinema that quickly changes from silent to talking .

At a time Downtown and the Golden age, Fellowes opted for an entertaining format in which determined women lead the action. Take, for example, the inimitable Violet Crawley, rich in good words, detours and carefully crafted remarks. She’s a matriarch’s humdinger. Violet secures future generations of matriarchs by bequeathing her French villa to Sybbie (Fifi Hart), who is the only granddaughter without a magnificent estate. Fellowes gives his senior deans the agency as well as crackling lines. His determined women tend to have the utmost business acumen and, in every way, save the day. Meanwhile, the men often wring their hands and fidget, all namby-pamby, like Robert Crawley and his downstairs double, Mr. Carson.

Lady Mary in Downtown also proves to be particularly adept at steering the ship, devising a way to save The Gambler’s production from the onset of the Sound Age and finding himself effortlessly in the film. His less stylish sister Lady Edith Crawley (Laura Carmichael) – Jan at Mary’s Marcia – resurrects her career as a journalist with a ‘scoop’ (Watergate it’s not) centered on how the upper crust now spends its summers in the south of France, a story she begins to write while visiting Violet’s villa.

Another wellness hot bath in the middle of the British, A new era feels like a response period to Ted Lasso, an equally sweet confection in which simple goodness still prevails and everyone behaves relatively well. Even the Labradors of Downtown keep their paws off the furniture, and cocky movie stars turn out to have soft hearts hidden away.

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UAE cultural events suspended due to President Sheikh Khalifa’s declared mourning period https://www.modernartforkids.com/uae-cultural-events-suspended-due-to-president-sheikh-khalifas-declared-mourning-period/ Fri, 13 May 2022 15:19:37 +0000 https://www.modernartforkids.com/uae-cultural-events-suspended-due-to-president-sheikh-khalifas-declared-mourning-period/ Major cultural events due to take place next month have been suspended following the death of Sheikh Khalifa, President of the United Arab Emirates. The cancellation or postponements follow an announcement by the Ministry of Presidential Affairs, indicating that there will be a 40-day official mourning period with flags to be lowered, as well as […]]]>

Major cultural events due to take place next month have been suspended following the death of Sheikh Khalifa, President of the United Arab Emirates.

The cancellation or postponements follow an announcement by the Ministry of Presidential Affairs, indicating that there will be a 40-day official mourning period with flags to be lowered, as well as three days of closure of ministries and official entities. federal and local levels, and the private sector.

An event at the Louvre Abu Dhabi, which would have transformed the auditorium into the Royal Opera House of Versailles for a special series of immersive performances inspired by the museum’s latest exhibition, Versailles & the World, has been canceled. Called The Royal Secret Soiree, the experiment consisted of integrating multidimensional theater performances, taking place from Friday to Sunday.

The Louvre Abu Dhabi will however remain open to visitors, as will other tourist attractions like the Qasr Al Watan presidential palace. Evening light shows at Qasr Al Watan will however be canceled during the mourning period.

The Dubai Comedy Festival, which kicked off on Thursday with a performance by Canadian comedian Russell Peters and is due to run until Sunday May 22, canceled a performance by Indian comedian Vir Das on Friday. A show by Filipino-American comedian Jo Koy at the Coca-Cola Arena on Saturday was also canceled.

Comedy festival organizers, however, said all other scheduled shows, including Comedy Bizarre and The Laughter Factory, would go ahead as planned from May 17.

“Stay tuned for the new schedule as well as the ticketing procedure for postponed events,” read a statement from festival organizers. “From all of us at the Dubai Comedy Festival, our thoughts and prayers go out to the family of His Highness Sheikh Khalifa bin Zayed Al Nahyan at this difficult time.”

Roots Arts, the weekly series bringing together the UAE’s creative community in art, fashion, food, music and dance, has announced that it is postponing a scheduled performance of the singer on Saturday. Emirati Shelter.

“Sheikh Khalifa bin Zayed Al Nahyan was an exemplary leader who paved the way for our nation’s success. May his light continue to shine on all those he touched and on the nation. In light of these events, we have postponed our event, Shelter, Rhythm & Grooves, and will share more details later,” Roots Arts posted on Instagram.

A new event called Break the Block, celebrating street food and music, which was due to take place Friday and Saturday at the Dubai Design District, is “postponed until further notice”. What is claimed to be Dubai’s ‘first street food block party’ was to bring together popular hip-hop and RnB artists from the UAE and street food trucks for the two-day event, complete with musical programming including DJ Kaboo, the Egyptian spinner who rose to international fame with his tracks appearing in the new Marvel anti-hero TV series, Moon Knight.

A performance by South African DJ Black Coffee, scheduled for Friday at White Dubai, has also been cancelled.

Jameel Arts Centre, the home of contemporary art in Dubai, said it would remain closed until Tuesday.

“With heavy hearts, we mourn the passing of the President of the country. His Highness Sheikh Khalifa bin Zayed Al Nahyan. May his soul rest in peace,” the center posted on Instagram.

Meanwhile, the Sharjah Children’s Reading Festival, which kicked off on Wednesday, said it would continue as planned on Friday evening, but workshops and activities will be cancelled. Plans for the next days of mourning are yet to be confirmed.

The event, organized by the Sharjah Book Authority, is taking place at Expo Center Sharjah under the theme Creating Creativity, with a 12-day program designed to instill a love of the written word in young people.

The Abu Dhabi Culture Summit, which was due to start on Monday, May 16, has also been postponed. Organized by the Abu Dhabi Department of Culture and Tourism, the fifth in-person event will be held under the theme A Living Culture, bringing together thought leaders and experts in arts, heritage, museums, media and technology for a series of round tables. sessions and discussions around the role of culture in a post-Covid-19 world. South African comedian Trevor Noah had been confirmed to attend.

DCT Abu Dhabi said new dates would be announced soon.

Still to be announced

Details of the capital’s main literary event, the Abu Dhabi International Book Fair, which is due to take place from Monday to Sunday May 23-29 at the Abu Dhabi National Exhibition Centre, have yet to be announced. The event will bring together more than 1,100 publishers from around 80 countries, with more than 450 activities including round tables, seminars, cultural evenings and children’s events.

The first International Congress of Arabic Publishing and Creative Industries is also set to take place on the eve of the book fair on May 23, with authors, publishers, filmmakers and bloggers gathering for the event organized by the Abu Dhabi Arabic Language Center and the DCT. Abu Dhabi.

Another major event taking place next week is the International Indian Film Academy Awards, set to take place on Saturday, May 21 at the Etihad Arena in Abu Dhabi, featuring Bollywood artists set to arrive from India. . The decision to go ahead or not has not yet been made.

Updated: May 14, 2022, 8:46 p.m.

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It’s All Costume and Drama with the Prized Period Pieces Film Collection | Cinema News https://www.modernartforkids.com/its-all-costume-and-drama-with-the-prized-period-pieces-film-collection-cinema-news/ Thu, 12 May 2022 06:14:08 +0000 https://www.modernartforkids.com/its-all-costume-and-drama-with-the-prized-period-pieces-film-collection-cinema-news/ Moviegoers have a seemingly insatiable appetite for meticulously detailed period drama, which is why we’ve rounded up the beautifully dressed Prized Period Pieces film collection for your viewing pleasure on SBS On Demand. Here’s a sample of what’s in the collection: A girl with an earring Colin Firth, the king of costume drama himself, stars […]]]>

Moviegoers have a seemingly insatiable appetite for meticulously detailed period drama, which is why we’ve rounded up the beautifully dressed Prized Period Pieces film collection for your viewing pleasure on SBS On Demand. Here’s a sample of what’s in the collection:

A girl with an earring

Colin Firth, the king of costume drama himself, stars as beloved Dutch Golden Age painter Johannes Vermeer in this lush film named after his famous gloriously Baroque work from 1665. Scarlett Johansson joins as as maid, Griet, who poses for the portrait wearing a gold dress, her hair tied back with a blue scarf that accentuates the price of the sparkling oyster she is carrying. Working from a screenplay adapting Tracy Chevalier’s novel, director Peter Webber, who began his career with a short film The zebra manexcels in detail detailing the true nature of their unfolding relationship.

A girl with an earring is now streaming on SBS On Demand.

If Beale St could talk

Barry Jenkins delivered stardust with his intricately drawn queer triptych Moonlight, then traveled back in time from contemporary Florida to recreate the New York neighborhood of Harlem in the 70s for this sequel based on James Baldwin’s heartbreaking novel. Swoonsomely lyrical, thanks to Baldwin’s sultry and sensual use of language, it presents KiKi Layne and Stephan James as lovers torn apart by cruel circumstances, with racist police brutality never far from their doorstep. If you’re a big fan of sleek cardigans, boxy flannel jackets, printed blouses and bright skirts, then Caroline Eselin’s costume design is dreamy.

If Beale St could talk is now streaming on SBS On Demand.

Reign of the Assassins

Everything everywhere all at once star Michelle Yeoh also kicks ass in this slice and dice of martial arts mayhem from co-directors Su Chao-Pin and Front/Off Master John Woo. Set in Ming dynasty China, it actually shares a bit in common with the movie Nic Cage vs John Travolta in that Yeoh plays Drizzle, an assassin hunted by his ex-colleagues who goes for an extreme facelift at the ‘Ancient. (surreal) insects to hide in plain sight (Kelly Lin plays Drizzle pre-munch). Working the wild wire and swordplay you expect from this type of fight club, costume designer Emi Wada also delivers divine silk robes.

Reign of the Assassins is now streaming on SBS On Demand.

On Chesil Beach

Atonement author Ian McEwan adapted his short story On Chesil Beach for the big screen under Dominic Cooke, who already had form in period dramas, having previously handled Shakespeare’s history plays in miniseries The hollow crown. In a not-so-swing 60s version, brooklyn star Saoirse Ronan (who also appeared in Atonement) plays Florence, a young bride who can’t stand going to bed with her husband Edward (Billy Howle, who played a petty officer in Dunkirk). A rare look at asexuality on the big screen, it also beautifully captures the heyday of British seaside holidays.

On Chesil Beach is now streaming on SBS On Demand.

Immortal’s Blade

One thing you’ll never get in a Takashi Miike movie is boredom. The ridiculously prolific Japanese director still delivers a wild ride that’s sure to look lavish even when the blood starts to pump (which he always does, a lot). This chaotic masterpiece rushes us (and many, a lot heads lost) in a fiercely stylish supernatural samurai showdown adapted from Hiroaki Samura’s manga series. Takuya Kimura plays the cursed undead warrior who must kill 1,000 men to breathe again. You may struggle to make out the fabulous details of the mid-Tokugawa shogunate period because of the dismembered bodies heaped together.

Immortal’s Blade is now streaming on SBS On Demand.

An ideal husband

Writer/director Oliver Parker has a thing for Oscar Wilde’s mischievous social commentary, immediately following this delightfully wicked Victorian-era romantic comedy starring The importance of being serious. Both feature the inimitable Rupert Everett, an actor who excels in period dramas and who really should have gotten more of those gigs. Here he plays Lord Goring, a dashingly dressed Wildean playboy bachelor who frustrates his father to no end. A politically charged backstabbing and blackmailing story, it’s an absolute hoot that looks the part and also stars Julianne Moore and our own Cate Blanchett in gorgeous dresses.

An ideal husband is now streaming on SBS On Demand.

Bajirao Mastani

India prides itself on delivering epic Romantic period dramas on a grand scale, and Bollywood master Sanjay Leela Bhansali (Devdas) does not disappoint with this jaw-dropping adaptation of the Marathi-language novel by Nagnath S. Inamdar Rau. Located in the court of Maratha Emperor Chhatrapati Shahu (Mahesh Manjrekar) in the early 18th century, it again combines its dish Ram Leela megastar leads Ranveer Singh and Deepika Padukone. He plays a faithless warlord who cheats on his wife (Priyanka Chopra) for the warrior princess of Padukone and soon learns a lesson when he thinks he can get away with the ghost. It’s gloriously OTT, spun much the same as old Hollywood gold, and the epitome of glamour.

Bajirao Mastani is now streaming on SBS On Demand.

Maudie

Sally Hawkins is no stranger to costume drama, having racked up the likes of Charlotte Brontë Jane Eyre and Charles Dickens great expectationsplus naughty lesbian period pieces Rock the velvet and finger cot. Irish director Aisling Walsh guides her through a skillful interpretation of the isolated life of Canadian painter Maud Lewis in the 1930s. Maudie worked through arthritis in her fingers throughout her life to deliver her brilliant visions of art folk. Ethan Hawke plays against type as true villain Everett Lewis, who took advantage of his poverty to hire her as a housekeeper, and also married her. It’s a harsh, but also incredibly tender portrait of a remarkable woman who, set in the wilderness of Nova Scotia, seems almost timeless.

Maudie is now streaming on SBS On Demand.

For more prized vintage pieces, browse the full collection on SBS On Demand.

Follow the author @SARussellwords

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Avalanche sweeps Nashville out of playoffs with third-period rally – The Denver Post https://www.modernartforkids.com/avalanche-sweeps-nashville-out-of-playoffs-with-third-period-rally-the-denver-post/ Tue, 10 May 2022 04:36:14 +0000 https://www.modernartforkids.com/avalanche-sweeps-nashville-out-of-playoffs-with-third-period-rally-the-denver-post/ NASHVILLE — A month ago, Calgary coach Darryl Sutter said playing the Western Conference-leading Avalanche in the first round of the playoffs would be “an eight-day loss.” He was almost right. Top-seeded Colorado needed just seven days to sweep the Nashville Predators. The Avs, who never trailed in the first three games against the Preds, […]]]>

NASHVILLE — A month ago, Calgary coach Darryl Sutter said playing the Western Conference-leading Avalanche in the first round of the playoffs would be “an eight-day loss.”

He was almost right. Top-seeded Colorado needed just seven days to sweep the Nashville Predators.

The Avs, who never trailed in the first three games against the Preds, fell behind in Game 4 on Monday but showed they hadn’t lost the art of the comeback in third period.

Colorado roared at Bridgestone Arena to defeat Nashville 5-3 and sweep the series to advance to the second round for the fourth straight year.

Defenseman Devon Toews, wing Valeri Nichushkin and center Nathan MacKinnon (empty net) scored in the final 11:05 of the third period to pin Nashville with its first-ever series sweep and fourth consecutive first-round outing.

“They had a good game tonight and I felt like we didn’t have a good one,” MacKinnon said. “But it will eventually happen. We found a way. This is the key; you can’t always win when you do your best. You have to find ways when you’re not and tonight was one of those cases.

“We just know with all the skills and talent we have that we were going to get one one way or another. Lots of good looks. And we finally got some, so that was good.

Colorado, who will face winner Minnesota Wild-St. Louis Blues series, has earned a little rest. The Wild and Blues are tied 2-2 going into Game 5 of this series on Tuesday. The earliest the Avs could start the second round would be Saturday.

“We’ve got guys that bumped into each other, we need a rest,” MacKinnon said. “So it will be good to take a few days off, to heal. We will take advantage of it. »

Nichushkin gave the Avs a 4-3 lead with 7:58 left in the third period. He did the easy part. Star defender Cale Makar slid past a defender against the left wall and delivered a backdoor pass to Nichushkin, who beat rookie goaltender Connor Ingram. MacKinnon added an empty-netter with 55.9 seconds left.

Makar finished with a goal and two assists and now leads all NHL players with 10 playoff points. He is the first defenseman since Paul Coffey in 1989 to reach nine points in the first four playoff games.

“You appreciate it – take advantage of it quickly,” Makar said of sweeping a first-round streak for the second year in a row. “We even touched on that in the room: it’s just the first step. So you enjoy it a bit, but then you move on.

“Obviously we don’t know who our opponent is yet. But it’s going to be a familiar team. So for us, it’s already at this next stage. We are where we want to be but we have to make sure we can stay tight through this little break we have.

Nashville took its first series lead at 3:58 of the third period when star winger Filip Forsberg scored his first playoff goal to cap a tic-tac-toe game with Mattias Ekholm and Matt Duchene. But Colorado, trailing 3-2, responded five minutes later when Toews beat Ingram with a wrist shot from the left circle.

The Avs got a solid game from goaltender Pavel Francouz, who made his first playoff start. He replaced Darcy Kuemper, who was stung in the face through his mask and left early in Game 3. Kuemper had swollen around his right eye too much to see the puck, and Justus Annunen, called up to the AHL, served as a backup for Francouz.

Colorado’s first two goals came from winger Andre Burakovsky and Makar to establish a 1-0, 2-1 lead. Burakovsky’s shot from the left circle snuck through the net behind Ingram. Replays proved it was a goal after the first save about 45 seconds later. It was the first point in Burakovsky’s series.

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Picasso’s Blue Period – The American Curator https://www.modernartforkids.com/picassos-blue-period-the-american-curator/ Fri, 06 May 2022 04:01:00 +0000 https://www.modernartforkids.com/picassos-blue-period-the-american-curator/ Picasso: Painting the Blue Periodto Phillips Collection, Dupont Circle, Washington, DC, through June 12. The strong should go ahead and take what they want: such a quasi-Nietzschean maxim is dynamite in the head of an impressionable youth, and that’s what Pablo Picasso (1881-1973) probably heard in his late teens. Living in Barcelona, ​​Spain’s most cosmopolitan […]]]>

Picasso: Painting the Blue Periodto Phillips Collection, Dupont Circle, Washington, DC, through June 12.

The strong should go ahead and take what they want: such a quasi-Nietzschean maxim is dynamite in the head of an impressionable youth, and that’s what Pablo Picasso (1881-1973) probably heard in his late teens. Living in Barcelona, ​​Spain’s most cosmopolitan city, the teenage student-painter frequented a circle of avant-garde artists and writers who gathered at a local tavern, Els Quatre Gats (The four cats). Picasso’s biographer John Richardson argues that the young Pablo absorbed Nietzschean ideas about the exalted role of the artist with consequences that would astound the European art world.

In 1907, Picasso painted his groundbreaking “Les Demoiselles d’Avignon”, placing himself at the top of the line as a leader of modernity in Europe. But that would only happen after he fiercely absorbed, digested, and then competed with the artists he encountered on the walls of museums and galleries. The list includes famous names – Degas, Van Gogh, Toulouse-Lautrec, Rodin – and many lesser known ones. Along the grueling road to early stardom, he faced venereal disease, poverty, depression, and guilt over a friend’s suicide. Not surprisingly, another principle he borrowed from the author of The birth of tragedy was “All art is born of suffering”.

As the comprehensive and brilliantly curated exhibition tells us Picasso: Painting the Blue Period (1901-1904) at the Phillips Collection in Washington, DC, ending June 12, many other forces shaped the artist’s early style. With nearly 90 works, including paintings, drawings and sculptures by Picasso and his influencers, as well as videos and elaborate wall texts explaining what lies beneath some of the images, it’s a rare opportunity to see how the most influential artist of the 20th century evolved into “Les Demoiselles”. The exhibition revolves around three paintings: “Blue Room” by Phillips (1901), “Crouching Beggar Woman” (1902) from the Art Gallery of Ontario and “The Soup” (1903). As a coda, there is an additional gallery devoted to works from the Rose Period (1905-6), his next style, which offers colorful views of circus performers and monumental female nudes.

In Charles Baudelaire’s seminal 1860 essay, “The Painter of Modern Life”, the poet urges contemporary French artists to turn away from classical beauty, “the eternal and the immutable”, and seek the beauty of “the ephemeral, the fugitive, the contingent” all around them in urban life. Manet and the group of painters who would be called Impressionists took this advice and sought out new styles and techniques to capture new subjects. Edgar Degas and Henri Toulouse-Lautrec, who influenced Picasso early on, were two of the greatest painters of modern life.For them, this meant the sleazy nightlife of cafes, salons and brothels.Pablo, 20, looks forward to taste these urban pleasures and to paint them by settling in a studio on boulevard de Clichy, near the famous Moulin Rouge, at the foot of the Butte in Montmartre 1901. The exhibition opens with a selection of works colorful and vividly painted representing performers and prostitutes he knew well. The erotic Picasso is honored in these first two galleries.

A shocking event occurred earlier this year that had a devastating effect on Picasso and his art. His close friend and sometimes housemate, painter and writer Carles Casagamas, committed suicide by shooting himself in the head in a Paris cafe in front of his friends. Pablo was back in Spain at the time to study El Greco’s work in Toledo. He painted several tributes to his friend, including a large and complex canvas, “Evocation (The Burial of Casagemas)”. In the lower half, a group of mourners dressed in blue stand around the white-wrapped corpse in a group similar to scenes in Lamentation. But then three half-naked prostitutes welcome the dead man mounted on a white horse into a distinctly ungodly paradise in the upper part. Picasso based his composition on one of El Greco’s famous two-tiered altarpieces, “The Burial of the Count of Orgaz” (1586), taking what he needed and going his own irreverent way.

In “The Blue Room”, one of the treasures of the Phillips Collection, Picasso focuses on a naked young woman washing alone in a room. Its elongated and elegant body derives from El Greco. The voyeuristic vision derives from Degas’ keyhole portraits of bathing women. Yet there is a profound pathos in the posture of the young woman – derived from Auguste Rodin’s statue of the fallen Eve – suggesting her vulnerability and resigned melancholy. The poster “May Milton” by Toulouse-Lautrec on the back wall underlines the fundamental importance of this French artist, who died a few weeks earlier from alcoholism and syphilis. Picasso brings together four influences in a complex but entirely successful and deliciously captivating painting.

Commuting between Barcelona and Paris, the painter suffers from depression and sees eros turn into pathos. His attention turned from the seductions of the two cities to the plight of their despised and neglected inhabitants. One explanation for this change was that Picasso had contracted an STD. Her doctor worked at the prison at Saint-Lazare Women’s Hospital near Montmartre, where prostitutes who had broken the law or were ill languished in prison. The doctor, passionate about art, allows Picasso to study and draw women. The painter later acknowledged that their fate was an impetus for the Blue Period. Picasso painted these women as isolated, pensive figures in a monochromatic way to make his audience feel the cold plight of these marginalized women.

Yet, as Richardson’s biography and catalog suggest, there was more to Picasso’s art of this period. His upbringing and training in Catholic Spain filled his imagination with dying saints, martyrs and sacred personages. The artist had a photographic memory, so it is possible that these images proved impossible to deny. During his residency in Barcelona, ​​he drew on the Christian pictorial tradition for a predominantly Spanish audience. Spanish paintings from the Golden Age of the Suffering Virgin echo in many of the works in the exhibition. Picasso secularized Christian imagery to heighten respect and empathy for the unfortunate homeless women and men of both cities. Blue was the traditional color of the Virgin’s robe. 16th-century artist Luis de Morales’s ‘Our Lady of Sorrows’ hangs on the wall next to Picasso’s ‘The Crouching Beggar’. The similarities in posture and dress reverberate.

In 1903 Picasso produced what may look like a simple painting of a mother bending down to offer her child a bowl of food, but the exhibition reveals the sophistication beneath the surface of “The Soup”. The painter began making sketches for the work while still in Barcelona. He returns to Paris for an exhibition, but his images of joyless women do not sell. He was often broke and couldn’t even afford canvases, so he tightened his belt and drew on scraps of paper or cardboard instead.

The work of two artists, Honoré Daumier and Pierre Puvis de Chavannes, became his inspiration. Daumier was a realist, sympathetically portraying the urban poor. The starting point is his watercolor of a mother at the table fiercely sipping her food while nursing her child. The almost forgotten Puvis de Chavannes painted large civic murals in a classical style. Picasso studied and drew figures from the murals of Sainte-Geneviève, now located in the Panthéon, and “Charité” in the town hall, depicting angels of mercy feeding the hungry during a siege of the city in times of war.

The fascinating sketches on display show how hard he worked on the composition. The mother of “La Soupe” is not Daumier’s fat plebeian but an elegant reclining angel. Chavannes’ style helped him monumentalize Daumier’s subject matter, becoming an allegory for the moral virtue of charity.

The painter understood Nietzsche’s maxim that the strong take what they want artistically. Heapplied this principle with increasing insight and evolving technique throughout the four years of the Blue Period, absorbing the work of other artists and then transcending them in a way suited to his inclinations, abilities and circumstances.

Joseph R. Phelan has taught at the University of Maryland, the Catholic University of America and the University of Toronto.

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